Long Division continues

Long Division continues until the 27th of November at the Govett-Brewster.

Foreground: Untitled Dyad (A) 2016, Acrylic on raw linen, cedar stretchers, 1600 x 1800 x 80 mm; Background: Untitled Dyad (C) 2016, Acrylic on raw linen, cedar stretchers, 1600 x 1800 x 80 mm

Foreground: Untitled Dyad (A) 2016, Acrylic on raw linen, cedar stretchers, 1600 x 1800 x 80 mm; Background: Untitled Dyad (C) 2016, Acrylic on raw linen, cedar stretchers, 1600 x 1800 x 80 mm

Analogues, 19 Sept - 14 October, Starkwhite

Starkwhite presents a suite of recent paintings by Matt Henry from 19 September to 14 October. Previously shown at Goya Curtain in Tokyo, these works appropriate specific graphic motifs found in the artist’s collection of video and audio media.

Using the anachronistic technology of painting Henry extracts memories from these obsolete formats in a way that parallels the often obsessive and reductive nature of Hi-Fi.

Drawing upon his library as source material he proposes these paintings as models that inform his experience of colour field painting, and as objects and memories that challenge modernist doctrines attached to non-objective abstraction.

Matt Henry (born 1973) lives and works in Auckland, New Zealand. Playing upon the contextual openness of reductive abstraction, Henry employs painting as a mimetic tool that often exploits formal intersections between the languages of painting and design. He received his MFA from Melbourne’s RMIT university in 2008 and his work is held in public and private collections including the Chartwell Collection, Auckland Art Gallery, Toi o Tāmaki; Wallace Arts Trust; New Zealand Ministry of Foreign Affairs & Trade; Elevation Capital Art Collection and the Dunedin Public Art Gallery.

Selected solo and group exhibitions include: Long Division, Govett-Brewster Art Gallery (2016); Personal Recordings, Matt Henry - Madoka Kouno, Goya Curtain, Tokyo (2016); Structural Relief, Te Tuhi Centre for the Arts (2014-15); High Fidelity, Starkwhite (2013); Elsewhere, Dunedin Public Art Gallery (2012-13); From the series 16:9, Sydney Non Objective (2012); Vernacular Painting, Starkwhite (2011); User Friendly, Te Tuhi Centre for the Arts (2011).

Artists Matt Henry and Emil McAvoy discuss the ideas behind the works in Long Division

This opening weekend, Matt Henry is joined in his exhibition by fellow artist Emil McAvoy to discuss the ideas behind the works.

In his new exhibition Long Division, Henry who was raised in New Plymouth, responds to the architecture of the Govett-Brewster galleries. Following major renovations and the addition of the Len Lye Centre, Henry is rediscovering the spaces that were once so familiar to him.

 

Matt Henry Untitled Dyad (C) 2016, acrylic on raw linen, cedar stretchers, 1600 x 1800 x 80 mm. Long Division exhibition installation view, Govett-Brewster Art Gallery. Photo Bryan James

Matt Henry Untitled Dyad (C) 2016, acrylic on raw linen, cedar stretchers, 1600 x 1800 x 80 mm. Long Division exhibition installation view, Govett-Brewster Art Gallery. Photo Bryan James

Long Division opens at the Govett-Brewster Art Gallery | Len Lye Centre

Matt Henry: Long Division runs 27 August - 27 November, Govett-Brewster Art Gallery.

For this new exhibition Henry responds to the architecture of the galleries in which his work is displayed.

Matt Henry grew up in New Plymouth and knows the Govett-Brewster Art Gallery intimately. Now, following major renovations and the addition of the Len Lye Centre, Henry is rediscovering the spaces that were once so familiar to him.

Henry’s spatial interventions take form in paintings that are installed in an unconventional manner, often embedded into the gallery walls or protruding into space.

For Long Division these minimalist interruptions have been designed and installed according to the artist’s close studies of the exhibition spaces and how we navigate them.

Matt Henry Untitled Dyad (C) 2016, acrylic on raw linen, cedar stretchers, 1600 x 1800 x 80 mm. Long Division exhibition installation view, Govett-Brewster Art Gallery. Photo Bryan James

Matt Henry Untitled Dyad (C) 2016, acrylic on raw linen, cedar stretchers, 1600 x 1800 x 80 mm. Long Division exhibition installation view, Govett-Brewster Art Gallery. Photo Bryan James

Part II. New Endings, Viewfinder, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision

Excerpts from Ton (1997 – 2005), SD video and audio track. Duration 5:48

Excerpts from Ton (1997 – 2005), SD video and audio track. Duration 5:48

Excerpts from Ton screens from today until the 30th of June as the second part to Matt Henry’s New Endings.

Viewfinder, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision’s moving image presentation at Auckland Central Library: 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Read Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision’s press release and more about Viewfinder here.

Now Showing at Viewfinder

Untitled Subtraction (1996), SD video, Duration 6:00

Untitled Subtraction (1996), SD video, Duration 6:00

Matt Henry: New Endings

1 - 30 June at Viewfinder, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision’s moving image presentation at Auckland Central Library: 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Comprising two video reels, New Endings will run in consecutive fortnight-long blocks, opening with Untitled Subtraction (1-15 June) and closing with Excerpts from Ton (16-30 June).

Produced early in his career, both these pieces share a search for beginnings and endings, an entry point into the shifting and fluid discourses about art’s relationship to language, parody, and critique.

Showing from this Wednesday ‘Untitled Subtraction’ captures Henry as he systematically paints over a text-based image on canvas. With this transformative act he erases a negative affirmation conceivably riffing upon the various end games played out in 20th Century painting. At the end of the short video we are confronted with a tabula rasa, suggestive of a beginning as much as an end point. This cyclic idea is echoed in ‘Excerpts from Ton’ which will screen from 16 June. Conceived as an incongruous creation allegory ‘Ton’ captures a domestic refrigerator and oven at the moment of their violent destruction and reconstitution.

Read Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision’s press release and more about Viewfinder here.

Opening at Goya Curtain, Tokyo

Matt Henry ~ Madoka Kouno ~ Personal Recordings

April 23rd – May 10th, 2016
Opening Saturday, April 23rd. 6-8PM

Image: Matt Henry, Dynamicron (2016), Acrylic on raw canvas, cedar stretcher, 382 x 468 mm

Image: Matt Henry, Dynamicron (2016), Acrylic on raw canvas, cedar stretcher, 382 x 468 mm

Goya Curtain is pleased to present Personal Recordings, an exhibition of sound and visual art featuring Madoka Kouno and Matt Henry. Sharing the physical and aural boundaries of the gallery space, Personal Recordings presents two discrete practices that in their own way deal with notions of medium, transcription, and abstraction.

Appropriating graphic motifs and colours used by various videocassettes circa 1980, Henry uses the anachronistic technology of painting to extract memories from this obsolete format. Drawing upon his own video library as source material, Henry proposes these paintings as models that preceded (and informed) his experience of colour field painting, and as objects and memories that challenge modernist doctrines attached to abstraction.

Madoka Kouno, a sound artist and improviser who has been performing since the early 2000s, presents two tracks that were recorded live at Ftarri, Tokyo, in November 2012. In this performance Kouno used tape recorders, a mixer, speakers, and digital tuners. Utilising the portable tape recorders (without cassettes) as sound making and amplifying devices, Kouno carefully manipulated and changed their positions in order to create subtle tremors and rich complex sound vibrations that radiated throughout the space.

About Matt Henry

Born in 1973, Henry lives and works in Auckland, New Zealand. Playing upon the contextual openness of reductive abstraction, Henry employs painting as a mimetic tool that often exploits formal intersections between the languages of painting and design. He completed an MFA from Melbourne’s RMIT university in 2008 and his work is held in public and private collections including the Chartwell Collection, Auckland Art Gallery, Toi o Tāmaki; Wallace Arts Trust; New Zealand Ministry of Foreign Affairs & Trade; Elevation Capital Art Collection and the Dunedin Public Art Gallery.
Matt Henry is represented in New Zealand by Starkwhite.
http://www.starkwhite.co.nz
http://matthenry.net

About Madoka Kouno

Born in Kanagawa. Kouno first became interested in epistemology and perception while studying at university. In 2003, she completed a course in "Sound / Art Expression" at Bigakko, after which she began performance focused on perception and cognition. Currently she performs using empty tape-recorders, metronomes, metal plates, etc to catch variations in interference and distance/space.
http://www.i-ma-wav.com


About Goya Curtain

Goya curtain is a project space situated in Tokyo’s Naka-Meguro ward.

http://www.goyacurtain.com
Address 上目黒2-12-3Meguro-ku, Tokyo
Contact details
hello@goyacurtain.com

Open hours Saturday, Sunday, Tuesday 3-7pm and by appointment.
Closed during Golden week.

From the studio

SOMA (Red/Yellow/Black), 2015
Acrylic on linen, cedar stretcher, 500 x 500 mm

Silian Rail, RM Projects

Matt Henry
You say Alabaster, I say Alabasta (diptych) 2015, Acrylic, linen, canvas, pine stretchers, 317 x 460 mm

Timothy Chapman Panel: pink/grey-1 2015, Pine stretcher, canvas, polyester resin, polyester filler, 350 x 350 x 32mm

Timothy Chapman
Panel: pink/grey-1 2015, Pine stretcher, canvas, polyester resin, polyester filler, 350 x 350 x 32mm

Matt Henry and Timothy Chapman

Silian Rail
Opening Wednesday 29 April, 6pm
Exhibition runs until Saturday 16 May 2015

RM presents Silian Rail, a conceptually driven painting project by Matt Henry and Timothy Chapman. Showcasing a playful rivalry, the exhibition documents a period of conversation and production, which considers the notion of painting and the materials of its production within a hierarchical and semiotic framework. Exploring surface through the structure of painting, Chapman’s works document a sculptural fabrication process. Setting out to cast a stretched canvas in woven composites, various preparations and experiments are presented as objects in their own right. Similarly Henry’s works reproduce or frame the reductive notion of painting as object and material. Executed in a perfunctory manner the chosen materials invite a conversation that is at once prosaic and poetic.

Structural Relief Te Tuhi

Matt Henry: Structural Relief (Te Tuhi)
Te Tuhi Project Wall, 15 November 2014 - 15 February 2015

Using painting as a departure point to explore relationships between art, architecture and design, Matt Henry has installed an arrangement of stretched white canvases on a white wall at Te Tuhi Centre for the Arts. Some of the canvases have been inset into the wall itself, while others are hung conventionally on its surface. Both rely on the play of light to define the internal and external forms and call into question the presence of a painting in a room, not as an image or surface, but as something that might become part of the architecture in which it is placed.

Image: Installation view of Matt Henry's Structural Relief at Te Tuhi Centre for the Arts